What Kind of Hosting Do I Need for My Website?

Choosing the right server for your website is an important decision – and a challenging one if you’re not sure what you’re looking for. Finding the correct fit for hosting your environment can have a significant impact on how you interact with it.. Your decision will be completely unique to your needs, so we’re breaking down each of the 4 main types of web hosting so you can make the best decision possible for your business.

 

  1. Shared Hosting
    Just like the name states, shared web hosting means your website “lives” amongst other websites on the same server. It’s one of the most cost-effective hosting solutions because you’re splitting the cost with other users. But this also means that traffic spikes or security issues on those other sites could affect your speed, limit your storage, or increase your downtime. Your best bet is to look for a web hosting system that guarantees uptime with the space you need at a reasonable cost.

It’s best for…

If you’re just getting started and aren’t very experienced with managing a website yet, shared hosting may be a good way to get your feet wet and experiment with what you need. It’s inexpensive and the set up is easier for beginners, and if you later decide that you need your own server, you have the option to upgrade.

  1. Cloud Hosting
    Cloud hosting is extremely scalable, allowing you to adjust your configuration on the fly. This enables you to respond to large website traffic spikes in real-time by adding resources and then scale back down once the demand has passed. Scale your server’s memory, processing capability, and storage almost instantaneously without any data migrations, downtime or reboots to make it happen.

    It’s best for…
    If you’re a new site owner or run a smaller business with have plans to grow, Cloud hosting helps you make adjustments easily and provide a great customer experience without a lot of technical work on your end. It’s also good for sites that are prone to random high traffic peaks.

  2. Shared Hosting
    Just like the name states, shared web hosting means your website “lives” amongst other websites on the same server. It’s one of the most cost-effective hosting solutions because you’re splitting the cost with other users. But this also means that traffic spikes or security issues on those other sites could affect your speed, limit your storage, or increase your downtime. Your best bet is to look for a web hosting system that guarantees uptime with the space you need at a reasonable cost.

    It’s best for…
    If you’re just getting started and aren’t very experienced with managing a website yet, shared hosting may be a good way to get your feet wet and experiment with what you need. It’s inexpensive and the set up is easier for beginners, and if you later decide that you need your own server, you have the option to upgrade.
  3. Dedicated Servers
    With dedicated servers, all the space, bandwidth and server access is “dedicated” to you and your website because you’re the only one on it. You can think of it as the exact opposite of shared hosting, offering the most reliable type of hosting solution. No matter what the size of your organization, you’ll get maximum uptime, unparalleled operational stability, and optimal security. The server you rent is yours to personalize to fit your business needs, including software updates and a number of hardware options, all done on your schedule.

    It’s best for…
    Sites with high-volume traffic or store substantial amounts of data due to the powerful performance and security features dedicated servers provide. It’s also great for larger, established companies that want to host multiple sites on the same server and don’t expect a lot of short-term growth.

  4. Colocation
    Colocation is the most hands-on approach to hosting. You can think of it as BYOS (Bring Your Own Server), as the hosting company provides the physical space and security, power, network connectivity, and environmental controls (humidity and cooling). You provide the servers and manage them completely. It’s typically best to colocate your servers nearby so you can access them for hands-on support, but some elect to use the hosting provider’s techs through a remote hands agreement for in-person support. This approach gives you the maximum control over your hardware and how it’s configured.

    It’s best for…
    Environments where specific hardware is called for. Since you provide the hardware, you have total control over its specifications. Colocation agreements can range from a single server to several racks worth. This approach is typically best for organizations that have in-house system administrators, as remote hands services are best used for emergencies and not routine maintenance and administration.

If you’re interested in learning more about the right hosting solution for your website, GigeNET will help you determine the space, control, and performance you need to achieve your business goals. Contact our experts to discuss your hosting options today.